CyberTracker in the Media

CyberTracker has already enjoyed worldwide media coverage. To achieve our objectives, ongoing media coverage is essential.

TV coverage of CyberTracker includes: CNN (World-wide), ABC News (USA), BBC News (United Kingdom), BBC (Tomorrow's World, United Kingdom), BBC World (World-wide), Sky TV (World-wide), ITN TV, ABC News (Australia), National Geographic Today (USA), Discovery Channel Europe, Discovery Channel USA, Discovery Channel Canada, VARA, Jules Unlimited (Netherlands), Voxtours (Germany), Africa Journal (Africa-wide), 50/50 (South Africa), Science Matters (South Africa), Carte Blanche (South Africa), a Reuters TV piece shown internationally, also TV coverage in Switzerland, France, Germany and Finland.

Press coverage of CyberTracker includes: Time (International), Economist (UK), National Geographic News (World-wide), New Scientist (United Kingdom), Wired Magazine (USA), Pour la Science (France), Science et Nature (France), Geo (Germany), Eos (Netherlands), Financial Times (United Kingdom), The Times (United Kingdom), The Sunday Times (United Kingdom), USA Today, Chronicle of Philanthropy (USA), Die Woche (Germany), Computer Bild (Germany), Le Point (France), The Australian (Australia), Computerworld (USA), Communications & Networking (Canada), The National Post (Canada), Geographical (United Kingdom), Ethos (United Kingdom), Corriere Della Sera (Italy), Ecologia International (Spain), Pen Computing (USA), Palmtop-Pro Magazine (Germany), and a number of newspapers and magazines in South Africa.

New Zealand Surveyor: Palm computers for spatially referenced social surveys in upgrading informal settlements

on . Posted in Print

Conditions in informal settlements are complex, at times violent, and continually changing. Managing these settlements in a way that will result in a functional, healthy urban environment constitutes a major challenge. Effective upgrading strategies require accurate, up-to-date social, economic and spatial information. This is especially so when the information is used for adjudication and titling. Moreover the information should be regarded as legitimate by settlement residents themselves.

Thus, residents participating in collecting data can contribute to an upgrade project succeeding. We describe two pilot studies where residents, with moderate levels of literacy, volunteered as field workers to collect data. They used a palm computer linked to a GPS and, using the Cybertracker system, collected socio-economic and spatial information. These studies were in an informal settlement in Cape Town, South Africa, and a rural land reform project close by. To simplify the process, icons were developed to represent questions or items of data to be recorded. After some initial difficulties, the field workers proved to be competent in using the hardware and software and the data that they collected were accurate. However, using icons to represent data items was found to be impractical. Instead, short text phrases were found to be appropriate and practical.

Read full article...

More on CyberTracker in the print media