CyberTracker in the Media

CyberTracker has already enjoyed worldwide media coverage. To achieve our objectives, ongoing media coverage is essential.

TV coverage of CyberTracker includes: CNN (World-wide), ABC News (USA), BBC News (United Kingdom), BBC (Tomorrow's World, United Kingdom), BBC World (World-wide), Sky TV (World-wide), ITN TV, ABC News (Australia), National Geographic Today (USA), Discovery Channel Europe, Discovery Channel USA, Discovery Channel Canada, VARA, Jules Unlimited (Netherlands), Voxtours (Germany), Africa Journal (Africa-wide), 50/50 (South Africa), Science Matters (South Africa), Carte Blanche (South Africa), a Reuters TV piece shown internationally, also TV coverage in Switzerland, France, Germany and Finland.

Press coverage of CyberTracker includes: Time (International), Economist (UK), National Geographic News (World-wide), New Scientist (United Kingdom), Wired Magazine (USA), Pour la Science (France), Science et Nature (France), Geo (Germany), Eos (Netherlands), Financial Times (United Kingdom), The Times (United Kingdom), The Sunday Times (United Kingdom), USA Today, Chronicle of Philanthropy (USA), Die Woche (Germany), Computer Bild (Germany), Le Point (France), The Australian (Australia), Computerworld (USA), Communications & Networking (Canada), The National Post (Canada), Geographical (United Kingdom), Ethos (United Kingdom), Corriere Della Sera (Italy), Ecologia International (Spain), Pen Computing (USA), Palmtop-Pro Magazine (Germany), and a number of newspapers and magazines in South Africa.

World Changing: Another World is Here - CyberTracker

on . Posted in Print

Another interesting fusion of technology and field biology: cybertracker, a program which allows users to note observations about plants or animals on a GPS-empowered handheld, and then merge those observations into a larger map of how habitat is changing or animals are migrating. As this article puts it:

"NORDHOEK, South Africa -- Sitting at his laptop computer, Louis Liebenberg compares two maps of the same area: While the first is plotted thickly with yellow dots, the yellow areas on the second map are far sparser.

"These dots represent sightings of lowland gorillas recorded by trackers both before and after an outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Lossi Sanctuary in the Republic of Congo. Using CyberTracker... the trackers were able to gather data that revealed in detail the decimation of the local gorilla population. Initially skeptical, scientists later confirmed their findings that the virus is killing gorillas and other animals, and published an article that appeared recently in the journal Science.

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More on CyberTracker in the print media